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There are 15 species of Ladybird found in Scotland. Six of them are common, with the other 8 founding a specific areas or localised habitats. Information on the 6 common species are below, the others are included on the Love Our Ladybird leaflet, available to download below:

 

Seven-Spot Ladybird

Seven-spot ladybird

Probably the most common and widespread species, found all over the UK. The 7-spot ladybird appears to have a stable population from the ladybird survey information.

It is found in lots of habitats, but most commonly found in grasslands, gardens and other low growing flowering plants. It isn't associated with any particular plant, and can often be found hibernating in the foliage of evergreen plants. The 7-spot ladybird eats aphids and is considered to be a friend to gardeners - especially ones who grow food or roses. The 7-spot is approximately 5-8 mm in size, is red in colour with 7 black spots. There are rarely different variations in colour, unlike some species, which makes it easy to identify.

Two-Spot Ladybird

Two-spot ladybird (Giles San Martin)

Another common and widespread species is the 2-spot ladybird which seems to have a stable population across the UK, but has been decreasing in England following the arrival of the Harlequin Ladybird. The 2-spot ladybird is found in lots of habitats, but most commonly found in grasslands, gardens and other low growing flowering plants. It isn't associated with any particular plant, and can often be found hibernating in buildings. It eats aphids and is another species loved by gardeners. The 2-spot ladybird is approximately 4-5 mm in size and can be very variable in colour. The most common form is red with 2 black spots, but it can also be black with red spots and have up to 16 spots.

Ten-Spot Ladybird

Ten-spot ladybird (Sandy Rae)

The 10-spot ladybird is common and widespread species, and appears to be decreasing in population according to the latest surveys. This species is strongly associated with deciduous trees and hedgerows and eats the aphids found around trees such as Oak, Lime and Sycamore. It usually hibernates low to the ground in leaf litter. The 10-spot ladybird is approximately 3.5-4.5 mm in size and is the most variable of all UK ladybirds. "Typical" forms of the 10-spot are yellow, red or orange with up to 16 maroon, dark brown or black spots. Other forms include buff or light brown with chequered pattern or purple to dark brown with yellow or orange shoulder flashes.

Cream-Spot Ladybird

Cream-spot ladybird (Tony Hisgett)

A common and widespread, particularly in the central belt of Scotland. Recent survey results suggest that the species is decreasing in abundance. The Cream-spot ladybird is found mainly in hedgerows and deciduous trees, with a particular association with Ash and Lime trees. This ladybird hibernates in the leaf litter of deciduous tree or in cracks in the bark of trees, and eats aphids and psyllids, which are plant eating lice. The Cream-spot is approximately 4-5 mm in size and is usually a red-brown colour with 14 cream spots. Rarely found with other colour forms, so is another easy to identify species. 

Orange Ladybird

Orange ladybird (Sandy Rae)

This is a common and widespread ladybird which is increasing in Scotland due to its recent association with Ash and Sycamore trees. The Orange ladybird is one of the vegetarian ladybirds which feeds exclusively on mildews associated with deciduous trees and has preference for Sycamore and Ash tree during its active period. The orange ladybird hibernates in shelter positions on trees or leaf litter. The Orange ladybird is approximately 4.5-6 mm big and only has one colour form - orange with 12-16 white spots. As it is the only orange ladybird in the UK, identification is easy.